Young at Heart

Young at Heart

The Young at Hearts ministry is a blessing. I hear their music every Thursday morning for my office as the beautiful choruses of old hymns drift up from the chapel. The simplicity is often so refreshing in today’s modern world, especially after a work-heavy morning. That’s one of the most endearing traits about the Young at Heart. With them, there is no distractions, no fancy lights, or performance mentality. These people are here to worship. When they sing, it’s just them and Jesus.

As you can imagine, it was more than a little awkward walking into a group of seniors as a young man in my twenties. The awkwardness didn’t last long. As soon as I sat down, the men and women at our table welcomed me and we had some lively conversation. The men and women joked around like longtime friends and invited me in to joke and talk with them. Many of them come for the breakfast (and doughnuts as they so freely admitted) and community as much as for the worship and teaching.

After more hymns, we had the privilege of listening to Melody Ferris on furlough from Taiwan. Before she spoke of her time in the mission field, she immediately thanked the seniors for their commitment to prayer. She said that Young at Heart was her favorite group because she knew that they would pray. So often when someone asks me to pray for them, I say something like “I’ll be praying for you.” I pray for a few days and forget after a few more. This is probably more common than most people would like to admit. Life sometimes just gets in the way and we forget the important things.

What I love about the seniors at Grace is that they pray when they say they will pray. They make time for what’s important. Maybe it has something to do with the slower pace after retirement, but it’s more than that too. In the long-term perspective of a walk with Christ, I think the things that really aren’t all that important have a tendency of falling away. It’s a good thing for us to remember. We always make time for what’s important to us, but whether what’s important to us is really important is the question to ask.

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